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EWN Designs

Rendering of a Living Jetty
Rendering of a Living Jetty.

Setting the Stage

Horizontal levee design
Horizontal levee design that achieves storm and flood risk reduction while increasing habitat value.

The EWN initiative continually seeks opportunities to provide the public with examples of water resources infrastructure that incorporates innovative designs and measures that are consistent with EWN principles. Our team of scientists, engineers and landscape architects have collaboratively pursued novel ways of approaching USACE infrastructure projects that produce the desired engineering outcomes while also achieving substantially greater environmental and social benefits. This page highlights many of the EWN designs that have been identified for a variety of different USACE activities. Through a series of workshops and other engagements, our team has synthesized EWN ideas and strategies into drawings and renderings for a variety of water resources projects. Ultimately, these exhibits were integrated into reports that offer additional details concerning the applicability of the innovative concepts and how they could be assimilated. We invite you to explore this webpage and the associated reports. It is also our hope that the information presented here will inspire you to pursue your own EWN opportunities.

More designs, renderings and reports will be made available as they are completed. We encourage you to visit this page periodically to view the latest design products.

Reports

The reports offered in this section are the products of USACE District project, engineering and study teams that explored possible opportunities to incorporate additional project benefits. In doing so, the teams identified a variety of ideas that incorporate EWN techniques and landscape architectural practices. Economic, social and environmental benefits are outcomes of that work, and those results are described in the following EWN/LA reports.

New Jersey Back Bays (NJBB)

New Jersey Back Bays (NJBB) - Beginning in July 2019, the Engineering With Nature® and Landscape Architecture project delivery team (EWN®-LA PDT) participated in a workshop hosted by the USACE's Philadelphia District (NAP) in which an array of potential NNBF design concepts and EWN strategies were developed for further consideration. Seven design concepts were prioritized to include more details, and these designs were then further refined during additional study and analysis. Over the next nine months, these concepts were evaluated with respect to application in the NJBB regions. The report details the results of those findings and also includes possible methods for pairing NNBF with non-structural measures to obtain coastal storm risk management (CSRM) and ecological benefits.

S2G report cover

S2G Report - This R&D report offers information on the innovative design concepts that were identified for components of the Sabine to Galveston (S2G) Project, which is a project of the Galveston District (SWG), US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). These design concepts combine Engineering With Nature® (EWN®) and landscape architectural (LA) approaches to infrastructure design in order to identify opportunities to incorporate "Natural and Nature-Based Features" (NNBF) into proposed S2G Project infrastructure.

Comite Canal Project

Comite Canal Project - In fall 2018, the Engineering With Nature® and Landscape Architecture project delivery team (EWN®-LA PDT) began working with New Orleans District (MVN), USACE to develop recommendations for how the on-going design and construction of the canal might incorporate EWN® principles and NNBF. This R&D report offers information on the innovative design concepts that were identified for Comite Canal.

W.P. Franklin & Moore Haven Lock and Dam

W.P. Franklin & Moore Haven Lock and Dam - In fall 2018, the Engineering With Nature® and Landscape Architecture project delivery team (EWN®-LA PDT) began working with Jacksonville District (SAJ), USACE to develop recommendations for how the W.P. Franklin Lock and Dam project area and Moore Haven Lock and Dam project area might incorporate EWN principles and NNBF. This R&D report offers information on the innovative design concepts that were identified for these two project areas.

Back Creek and Fishing Creek Jetties

Back Creek and Fishing Creek Jetties - In fall 2018, the Engineering with Nature® and Landscape Architecture project delivery team (EWN®-LA PDT) began working with the Baltimore District of the US Army Corps of Engineers to develop recommendations for repairing jetties in Chesapeake Beach, Maryland, at the mouth of Fishing Creek; and in Annapolis, Maryland, at the mouth of Back Creek. This study has examined alternative options, which are intended to both maintain the navigation-related performance criteria for the jetties and to provide enhanced ecological value on or in the vicinity of the jetties.

Moses Lake Tide Gate

Moses Lake Tide Gate - In January 2019, the Engineering with Nature® and Landscape Architecture project delivery team (EWN®-LA PDT) began working with Galveston District of the US Army Corps of Engineers to develop recommendations for protecting the shoreline areas near the Moses Lake Tide Gate. This study examined options for increasing resilience in the vicinity of the tide gate while also integrating additional environmental and social benefits. This R&D report offers information on the design concepts that were identified for the project area.

The Value of Renderings

diverse marine ecology of area near Galveston-Bolivar
Design rendering that depicts diverse marine ecosystem near Galveston-Bolivar, Texas.

Producing LA renderings is a valuable technique that can be leveraged to convey information about a project and its integration with the surrounding environment. Using standard orthographic and perspectival representation techniques including plan, section-elevation, section-perspective, and aerial perspective, LA renderings can depict the intended conditions of a completed project. Various dimensions of a proposed project, such as how it would be experienced by recreational users, how it would provide engineering benefit, and how it might develop as habitat for plant and animal species, can also be illustrated within renderings and described by annotations layered on top of renderings. LA renderings can also be used to make before-and-after comparisons between existing conditions [captured in photographs] and proposed conditions [shown in the renderings]. Such drawings can offer diverse audiences, which include decision-makers, project planners, and the general public, greater insight into future-anticipated changes to environmental conditions and/or the addition of human-use benefits.

The following designs and renderings are derived from the EWN/LA reports listed on this page. The images are included here as independent files for use when illustrating a broad range of EWN techniques

File Name Description
Rendering of a Living Jetty Jetty design with expanded ecosystem services.
WP Franklin Recreation Area Depiction of restored river bank that reduces erosion while also incorporating native vegetation and social benefits.
Moore Haven Birds Eye Aerial of restored parcel that includes walking trails, native vegetation and other recreational opportunities.
Horizontal Levee Birds Eye Horizontal levee design that achieves storm and flood risk reduction while increasing habitat value.
Ecological History of
Galveston – Bolivar
Design rendering that depicts diverse marine ecosystem near Galveston-Bolivar, Texas. Drawing by Jaspuneet Kaur, completed in Auburn University landscape architecture studio - collaboration with Engineering With Nature® and the Galveston District.
Marsh Mound Examples Rendering that depicts marsh mounds created through beneficial use of dredged sediment. Drawing by Yuanyuan Gao, completed in Auburn University landscape architecture studio - collaboration with Engineering With Nature® and the Galveston District.
Horizontal Seawall Rendering that depicts a marsh-vegetated, horizontal seawall with pedestrian walkway.
Multifunctional Basin Design drawing that highlights social and environmental benefits that can be achieved when integrating multi-functional basins for the purpose of reducing impacts that result from intense storm events.
Pine Flatwoods Image of pine flatwoods ecosystem proposed for a community in connection with an adjacent water infrastructure project.
Pond Apple Basins Image of pond apple basins proposed as a restorative action to mitigate flooding and return natural function to a larger system.
Tide Gate Living Shoreline Design rendering that illustrates the integration of vegetation and shoreline stabilization features in an area prone to erosion and high-energy currents.

Teamwork and Collaboration

Engineers, scientists and landscape architects conduct visioning exercise
Engineers, scientists and landscape architects conduct visioning exercise to identify potential EWN strategies and NNBF solutions.

Engineers and scientists that practice EWN are knowledgeable about natural and engineering processes, and they appreciate the “value added” when integrating the two to support a water-based, infrastructure project. Adding landscape architects to our team resulted in another layer of capability, and therefore, expanded the possibilities to identify EWN options for projects. Landscape architects (LAs) are formally trained to think about how people interact with a design. LAs also translate the conceptual stage of a project directly into a specific drawing by using a visual vocabulary for communicating how natural processes can be integrated into traditional engineering projects. Given the complimentary nature of disciplines that are required, and mutual interest in infrastructure enhancement, a collaborative effort was initiated to further promote those shared design principles and precedent knowledge. Thus, EWN strategies are collaboratively pursued by engineers, hydrologists, biologists, ecologists and landscape architects.

Acknowledgements

The EWN initiative is grateful to the Dredge Research Collaborative (DRC) for their collaboration and partnership in the development of the renderings and reports that are showcased on this page. Collaborations between the DRC’s landscape architects and ERDC’s scientists and engineers began in summer 2017. Since that time, the team has pursued numerous projects that have incorporated EWN concepts into traditional water resources infrastructure. For more information about the DRC, please visit: https://dredgeresearchcollaborative.org/